Begin to live and love in the moment, and let go of the fear holding you back from connecting with others and demonstrating love.

Living and Loving in the Moment

By Teresa Adair, Executive Director

Published March 24th, 2017

Why assume I know God's timing? Why not be in the moment appreciating the beauty, sadness or pain? It is going to freeze, and the frost will kill my plants. My thinking is in the future instead of the moment. It’s March; things are blossoming – I experience fear of everything freezing and miss the beauty...

Live in the moment.

I stroll through the hardware store, watching people browsing, looking at baby ducks and finally stopping at the baby chicks’ cage. The ducks were quiet, forming a large circle, and keeping each other warm under the heat lamps. The chicks were all running and jumping — just crazy town. I just imaged them saying: “The sky is falling! The sky is falling!"

"We are all connected. When we help just one person, we help ourselves." Tweet

Looking closer, I saw it. The little chick stuck under the scurrying feet, unable at that moment to get up, at that moment knowing it would not live through the chaos.

I turned my head and walked away, saying to my friend, “I cannot watch this.” As I continued to contemplate what this meant to me, of course everything felt wrong, especially my action of walking away.

I wanted to get the chicken out of there, wrap him in warmth and love, then say goodbye in a loving way. I feared what might happen in the future! The person I was with might think I was crazy. The hardware store might get angry. I might have to buy all the chickens. I knew not watching the hurt did not make the hurt disappear for the small creature. Now, in the moment of the walk away, the action felt selfish. It was not helping others in their chaos.

I am seeing the walk away constantly in humans. Staying to watch and give the support needed is just too hard. What good will it do? Maybe someone will view my actions and see it as an example or maybe they won’t.

My heart needs to open to the fact there is a need in that moment. Maybe someone will follow the examples, pick up a wounded soul, dust if off, give it a hug, then let it go — let it go to become a natural part of the cycle of life. The pain suffered does nothing if it does not teach something. Letting go of the pain is so hard.

Gathering the chick was too hard for me in that moment, but I know today I would pick the chicken up, I would wrap him in love and say goodbye. In now knowing this, I’ve learned the lessons of having the courage to get through my pain of watching, and to honor the process of the circle of life.

We are all connected. When we help just one person, we help ourselves. If someone you love is suffering, if you can stand in your own pain and help them let go you will learn to let go. You will be learning to let go of the pain and so much more.

There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens.
NIV Bible. Ecclesiastes Ecclesiastics 3:1

Keep in mind the love you give away is what you leave behind. Don’t let your ego and your fears get in the way of showing love. It is judgement saying it is wrong action instead of saying I must stay here in this pain.

As in baseball, we must go home to score; we must reach the end of the game. A lot of other players want to come to the show. I listen to the stories, watch the movies — the stories I like have laughter, sadness, pain and lessons.

Tell your story. You must. Don’t walk away with regrets.

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About the Author

Teresa Adair, Executive Director of Crossroads Hospice Charitable Foundation, shares why we must let go of fear and pain to being genuinely loving and living in the moment.

Teresa Adair

Executive Director

As Executive Director, Teresa Adair is responsible for all aspects of policy and partnerships for the Foundation. She has a passion for hospice and an admiration for the people who support it. Teresa has been involved with the Crossroads Hospice family since its inception in 1995.

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